Sunday, March 19, 2017

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Catching Up with the Kings, Part 1: Stephen

If you follow this blog, then maybe you know that I've been putting off reading End of Watch (King's as-of-this-writing most recent novel).  The reasons for that are complicated and weird and not really of interest to anyone other than myself.  Despite that, I blabbed about them at length here.
  
They are not worth rehashing, so I won't rehash them, but it is worth mentioning again that the delay between the release of End of Watch and my sitting down to read it is by far the lengthiest on my personal record for a new King novel (assuming we are not counting King novels released prior to 1990 or so, when I became a Constant Reader).  That's been eating at me.  It's a thing that can no longer be tolerated, and so even though I have not achieved the weight-loss goals I informally set for myself as a prerequisite for reading End of Watch, I've decided to sit down with the novel and get current with King.
  
Thing is, I'd also fallen behind on a few other King books, such as the edited-by-King Six Scary Stories and the partially-by-King Hearts In Suspension.  Plus, there are also a few new short stories of his I haven't read, not to mention books and stories by the sons-of-King writers Joe Hill and Owen King.
  
Rather than dick around and try to write reviews of each of these things, I've decided to just run through all of it and leave some brief impressions of each here.  Not sure if that's the optimal way to do things, but it's what makes sense to me at this particular time.  I'll avoid spoilers in all cases; this is going to be fairly brief.
  
My first thought was to do it in chronological order by release date, but nah, damn that.  There's a novel by Stephen King in the world that I have not read yet.  There's no way to begin anywhere but there.
  
  
  
  
I was entertained by both Mr. Mercedes and Finders Keepers, but I'd be a liar if I said that either one ranked highly on my list of favorite King novels.  Maybe that created a bit of trepidation to get into the third one...?  I don't really think it did, but let's not rule it all the way out.

In any case, having finished it I would conclude that this is easily one of my least favorite King novels.  It's not awful; I enjoyed reading it, at least for the first two-thirds or so, while King's writing still felt engaged.  I'm not a huge fan of Bill Hodges, but he's okay; same goes for Holly Gibney.  The reason for that, I think, is that King himself loves both characters, and that love comes through onto the pages and -- for me -- is somewhat infectious.  But only somewhat, and it can only get King so far.